What temperature do you cook deer meat to?

What temperature is venison safe?

Ground venison should be cooked to a minimum temperature of 160°F (70°C), while whole cut steaks or roasts should reach 145°F (65°C) (7). Once these internal temperatures have been reached, the venison is considered safe to eat regardless of what color it is, as it still may be pink inside (7).

What temperature do you cook deer backstrap?

The biggest element to pay attention to when cooking venison backstraps is the temperature. Venison backstrap temperature should never rise above 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Your final target range is 130-135 and it will be cooked medium rare.

How long should you cook deer meat?

Place the steaks on the grill or in the pan and cook for about 5-7 minutes per side (this will depend on steak thickness), but keep an eye on the internal temperature. You want to pull the steaks at 125-130F for a medium-rare steak, it’s very important not to overcook venison.

What is the best way to cook venison?

Venison steaks are best cooked to medium-rare and left on a covered plate to keep warm. Leaving them on the grill too long or to keep them warm will also result in dry steaks.

How do you cook venison without drying it out?

Braising, a slow, wet-heat cooking method well suited to tough cuts, is an easy way to prepare venison without it turning out dry and chewy. It works well whether you have smaller venison cuts such as chops or steaks, or larger cuts such as loin, shoulder or other roasts. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

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How do you cook wild venison?

Heat a large heavy-based frying pan until very hot, and then sear the fillet on all sides until dark golden-brown on the outside (this will take about two minutes). Then reduce the heat to low and gently fry, turning regularly, for 6-8 minutes or until cooked to your liking.

How do you make deer meat tender?

Hanging your meat, skin on, for about two weeks is the best option. Aging the meat allows the animal’s natural enzymes to break down the connective tissues and mellows the flavor. Cihelka said this is the reason his venison is so tender. Hunters don’t always do this.